Where We Come From

At The Beginning...
The Communist Party, led by Pol Pot, took over Cambodia in 1975.  The Cambodian people feared this man and tried to escape from his harsh rule.  Thousands of them succeeded and found refuge in the neighboring country of Thailand.  In 1979, the U.S. government granted the Cambodian refugees passage into America.  In 1981, we and many other refugees came here to Utah.  The vast majority of the refugees believed in Buddhism and many were converted to Mormon.  However, we were welcomed and introduced to Christ by a small church in Salt Lake City.

The First Christian Reformed Church lead by Pastor Tom Devries reached out and taught us the Gospel.  Although they provided us with a translator for the worship services, there remained a language barrier.  Up until 1984, we had no Cambodian pastor or evangelist to work with us.  It was then when the First Church recruited and trained Charlie Phim and Monineth Tak to lead our people.  In 1987, we started our own church while sharing the same building with the First Church.  We became known as the Cambodian Christian Reformed Church.  Together, Pastor Charlie and Monineth lead the CCRC for over a decade.  In 1999, Monineth and his family left the CCRC to begin a new ministry in order to spread God's Word.

A New Beginning...

As a Cambodian teenager upon reaching adulthood, it became customary to turn away and leave the church, seeking common excuses such as work or boredom.  Our pastor recognized this problem and realized that if we continue along this path and fail to accommodate this "new generation," we will never grow.  He wanted a way to connect with this new generation (who were raised in America and mainly speak English) while still appeasing the older generation.  In order to achieve this goal, he changed the way he did the Sunday worship service by conducting two separate services.  The first hour would be dedicated to the Cambodian language, and the second hour would be done in English.  In the second hour, the teenagers had a chance to actively participate in the service by singing in the choir, leading the offering ceremony, reading Bible passages, or by delivering a prayer.  This pleased the older generation to see their children becoming active within the church while giving the new generation a sense of purpose.